Your Children and Video Games

Joined
May 5, 2014
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Miami, Florida
It was inevitable that my boys would become gamers since their dad ultimate gamer. We love video games via computer or the television. It is a great to bond on a lazy Saturday or as a reward for the kids doing extra chores around the house or great comments and grades in school. But for hubby it is a de-stressor from work or a downtime activity when he is bored or in the mood to play.
 

Ellyn

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May 8, 2014
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Earlier games were, I think, all about the actual game. Without any ending, it could get repetitive and addictive. It did probably train eye-hand coordination and a better understanding of basic logic and space, but I understand putting limits to it.

Nowadays, video games are a storytelling medium. They're like novels, with worlds and characters, with emotional engagement and philosophical themes. They can even be better as a storytelling medium than a book or a television series, because books and television series are passive, whereas with video games the stories are crafted so that the player has to think and make a choice that will affect the story.

One of my favorite games of all time is Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 4, on the Playstation 2 and PSP. It's rated M because it contains sex and violence, but it's not gratuitous about it. The rather dark content is really an exploration of some difficult aspects of life in otherwise ordinary people. It's not the fault of the game if the players are perverted or violent and focus on those aspects. When sexuality comes up in the game, it's as an exploration of a serious social issue surrounding sexuality. When violence comes up in the game, it's an exploration of trauma--so it's not about consequence-free violence that makes people less emotionally sensitive. It's very emotionally sensitive.

Basically, it depends on the game...and the player...because, by now, it's become a storytelling medium.
 

MichiganMom

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Aug 2, 2014
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Michigan, USA
I kept my children from video games until about age 10. Instead we had a weekly family game night with board games, cards, or outdoor activities. Usually the one night a week turned into several. My boys are now teens and we homeschool. They often use video gaming activities for their educational interests. For example, there is a game that teaches you cell biology, and another which uses a viral plague to kill off populations. You have to engineer the plague taking in factors such as demographics, method of distribution and the properties of the individual illness. That's just one example of how we use video gaming to support our more traditional college bound curriculum. Other games such as Assassins Creed have allowed me children to discuss historical fact vs. fiction and explore societal norms and secret societies. While I do not advocate all day video gaming, sometimes my kids do spend a solid 3 hour block gaming. As long as their other obligations such as their internships, household duties and school work are complete I find no problem with them using video games for edutainment.
 

GalwayGirl88

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Aug 1, 2014
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There's nothing wrong with anyone playing video games, but like everything else, it must be in moderation. I wouldn't want my child doing any activity for excessively long periods whether it be watching tv, reading, or even playing sports, because nothing done to excess is ever a good thing.

I used to be one of the "video games are just plain bad" brigade, but when I actually undertook some research into it, video games have a place in your child's education, and can be very beneficial to kids who have difficulty with numbers and literacy. Please don't write things off just because you don't understand them or you feel it's not a social enough activity. Everything in moderation is key in all aspects of life.
 

Phil Moufarrege

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Aug 6, 2014
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Japan
One of my dream jobs (that I achieved) was to work in video games as a 3d artist. I did that for 4 years.
I love video games and they are excellent for building creativity for anyone who decides to play it. "banning" video games is like banning your children from watching movies. Video games are just a more interactive form of a movie. I am not a fan of imposing my belief limitations on children, it only leads to resentment down the track.