What would you say to your younger self?

GalwayGirl88

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As you move on with your journey in personal development, do you ever look back (say) 10 years, and think about who you were back then and how you've changed? What advice would you give to the person you were back then, and how would the person you were take that advice?

As an avid journal writer from the age of 16, I find it very useful (and fascinating) to revisit my journals from different periods in my life, just to see how I'm doing now, and how I've progressed with some of the things that bugged me back then. Whenever I do this I find myself wondering what that person would be like now, if I hadn't made the decisions I made.

So, what would you say to your younger self?
 

Ellyn

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10 years ago, I was just about to undergo a major life change that would prompt a huge recovery from an affliction that I didn't even know that I had--a whole childhood of undiagnosed avoidant personality and obsessive-compulsion. I would be about to learn everything that present-time-self would have to share anyway.

Maybe 9 years ago, I would try to give advice to stop the equally-major backsliding that I did: "Don't give yourself up to a system, and that means other people, even family. I know you won't be a jerk, but you can be a doormat--don't. That will ruin your life, and the lives of people who you wanted to make life easier for anyway.

"The way that you've lost, was not the only one--and it was paved for people to make their way, whereas you're fated to cut through the jungle to make your own path, and that's not a bad thing; it's stigmatized, but it's not the worst thing in the world in and of itself and it's not a bad thing."

I'd also advise my past self to look up life hacks and expand much, much, much more into how to be economical...but she didn't have the energy for that, and wouldn't know where to begin, and had no good examples at all. (My mother had lost her job 10 years ago, while I was still a dependent--and the thing is, my mother was a very very spoiled rich kid who didn't know how to be poor, and when I look back on it I'm horrified at how incompetent she was at life in general--let alone mothering. She had no financial literacy to pass on to her children. I've had to figure that out myself, fair enough, but boy do I wish I had all this knowledge sooner! But I don't think I was even open to that, in the past.)
 

Phil Moufarrege

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If I could go back 15 years ago I would say this: "Never take anything personally. Having high levels of performance is 100% easier when you are healthy - Get healthy. Quit school, don't go to college, and don't get a job. Start thinking of how to make a living from the things you love RIGHT NOW instead of waiting. Imagine who you want to be and what that person would be doing/thinking everyday. Do it now."
 

GalwayGirl88

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10 years ago, I was just about to undergo a major life change that would prompt a huge recovery from an affliction that I didn't even know that I had--a whole childhood of undiagnosed avoidant personality and obsessive-compulsion. I would be about to learn everything that present-time-self would have to share anyway.

Maybe 9 years ago, I would try to give advice to stop the equally-major backsliding that I did: "Don't give yourself up to a system, and that means other people, even family. I know you won't be a jerk, but you can be a doormat--don't. That will ruin your life, and the lives of people who you wanted to make life easier for anyway.

"The way that you've lost, was not the only one--and it was paved for people to make their way, whereas you're fated to cut through the jungle to make your own path, and that's not a bad thing; it's stigmatized, but it's not the worst thing in the world in and of itself and it's not a bad thing."

I'd also advise my past self to look up life hacks and expand much, much, much more into how to be economical...but she didn't have the energy for that, and wouldn't know where to begin, and had no good examples at all. (My mother had lost her job 10 years ago, while I was still a dependent--and the thing is, my mother was a very very spoiled rich kid who didn't know how to be poor, and when I look back on it I'm horrified at how incompetent she was at life in general--let alone mothering. She had no financial literacy to pass on to her children. I've had to figure that out myself, fair enough, but boy do I wish I had all this knowledge sooner! But I don't think I was even open to that, in the past.)
Great answer, Ellyn! I'm particularly interested in your final paragraph - it resonates with me, and I think in some respects that my view of my own mother, mirrors that of your view to your mother. I grew up without any financial know-how either. I had to learn how to have a relationship with money - and one of the things I would say to my younger self would be "thank goodness you asked for help in dealing with your money!".
 

Veronica

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I would tell myself to get my college degree! So many opportunities available when the educational background is there and so much to fall back on when life doesn't go as planned. College not only provides an avenue for more income opportunities, it also helps open your mind and expand your way of thinking.
 

Manuel

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Spend much more time figuring out what you really want to do in your life!

At 18 you start making some of the most important decisions in your life. The reason why many people end up having a mid-life crisis when they hit their forties (or so) is that they haven't spent enough time when they were young to find out what really matters to them.


A great way to do get in touch with your 'true self' is to use the so-called eulogy exercise:

Think about the end of your life. Imagine your own funeral (if you feel more comfortable you can also choose to think of your 80th birthday). Take time for yourself and think back on the life you would have lived. It will help you to consider these questions:

  • How would you like to be remembered after you died?
  • What kind of husband/wife or child or parent would you say you were?
  • What kind of friend and colleague would you say you were?
  • What would you like to have accomplished in your life?
  • What is the legacy you would like to leave behind?

Write down how you would have lived and what you would have done. Take as much time as you need and revisit what you wrote if you feel like adding something later on.
 

GalwayGirl88

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I would tell myself to get my college degree! So many opportunities available when the educational background is there and so much to fall back on when life doesn't go as planned. College not only provides an avenue for more income opportunities, it also helps open your mind and expand your way of thinking.
That's so true Veronica! Education is so important to so many areas of our lives. If I had the time I'd take on another degree course myself. I can't believe how some kids dismiss education now like it doesn't matter in today's job market. I think it matters more than ever.
 

sherman joseph

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If I could back 10 - 15 years, I would tell myself Thank You. I know that may sound odd. Even though I did some dumb things, I also did some great things, however no matter what, those years helped to shape me into the person that I am today.
 

Jason Surmillon

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As you move on with your journey in personal development, do you ever look back (say) 10 years, and think about who you were back then and how you've changed? What advice would you give to the person you were back then, and how would the person you were take that advice?

Great post by the way! It's fun answering these questions lol

Looking 10 years back I would of told myself to keep reading to improve myself and never quit on the things that will help bring me towards my goals and ambitions. Back in the days I would do a lot of personal development, but my mentality to do things consistently was no where to be found. I was not as open minded 10 years ago so I would of probably consider my advice, but mostly likely not take any action.

Fast forward 10 years I'm completely different. I'm very open minded, consistent on personal development, more ambitious then ever, and more importantly I learned to take responsibility for every action that I do.

I still have a long way to go to where I want to be so I look forward to learning a lot as I live.
 

namktqs

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If I can go pass and start again, I will want to be myself right now, have more believe in myself on my dream, my goal, and more persistence. I want to I can see big picture in life as right now. But that is my experience, and I also love this.