Does working longer hours actually improve our productivity?

Lana James

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We often believe that if we are not working long enough, then we're not working hard enough. I've read that working longer than 11 hours increases your risk of having heart disease. What are your thoughts about this?
 

live4it

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I don't think longer hours increase work productivity because after so many hours your mind gets so tired it actually decreases in productivity which may result in mistakes that need to be redone in the future. I think efficiency is the best way to increase productivity. I've worked many double 16 hour shifts and after about 14 hours you reach that "i don't care just make it to the end of the shift" attitude, which is obviously not a good one to have. Safety is also important if you work in a high risk job, or physical job such as construction. As you get tired you loss awareness, and thats when injuries happen. Your not going to be very productive you your laid up in a hospital, or home with an injury.
 

matthewebbert

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Its not physically.. its mentally... its totally based on how effectively you are working..
 

zararina

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If someone is working for longer hours without proper breaks and proper conditions, that person will eventually decrease productivity and mistakes or accidents could be increased. I think someone should just work on right amount of hours depends on the kind of work and working conditions.
 

Dreek Lass

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I am not sure about this one. I can only speak from my own personal experiences on this. Personally, I would be more exhausted if I was working longer hours, and so then my productivity would decrease because of how tired I am when performing the tasks that venture into long hours? That is sort of my take on it, but at the same time if you are working longer and you are under that pressure and the adrenaline is pumping, then you probably are getting a lot of things done and being very productive. So it may be productive for work and your work life, but not for your personal life and health, in my opinion.
 
M

Mick

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It depends on what you define as work, if you are doing something you love, you can "work" as many hours as you like without ill effects because it is fun to do
 

Jo Edwards

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Timothy Ferris is big on working less. He's got an entire blog dedicated to working less. IT's called the4hourblog and he released a book called the 4 hour workweek. Working more hours may actually be less productive. Pareto's law says that a majority of our efforts create a minority of our results. 80% of your day goes to about 20% of your results. If you stop doing that 80% and you work 10hrs a day, you'll end up working 2 hours a day, and get 80% of the work done.

Brian Tracy is all about keeping a to-do list. Every morning he wakes up 2 hours before he has to be someone, then he reads uplifting material and plans out his day. He puts the most important activities on the top of his list and does those first. He says "If I were to suddenly have to go out of town, or If I were to suddenly get sick, what is the one thing that I would want to have done?"

If you follow the 80/20 rule, and get rid of the unimportant stuff, and focus on the important things, you'll actually get more done while working less. Then if you decide to work more hours, you're more productive. I find that even if I'm working for someone else, when I do this, I make myself un-firable.

I've even found a way to dictate my own hours when i'm working under someone in a minimum wage food service job. If I can do that, you can reduce the number of hours you work, even automate, but still receive the same monthly income.
 

Praveen

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Working long hours leads to mental, emotional and physical deterioration. It is also a sign that one is not enjoying the work they are doing.

When you find a career that aligns with your interests, the 'hours of work' concept gets cut from the picture, because the involvement in the activity is so deep and enjoyable.

I have personally experienced that when i am doing an activity that i love, i accomplish lots of things in a short period of time, and even if it takes long, my energy level remains high and mind remains fresh.

Employers are realizing this and introducing multiple fun activities in the workplace to boost morale and energy levels. However, it is imperative for the long term well being of a person to find a career aligned with his/her purpose and interests.

http://www.margavita.com
 
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Personally, long days reduce my productivity. Breaks help and working continuously at a task (for the span of 40 min to 2hrs, depending on the task) can help me actually complete or get a big chunk of it done. Spending small bits of time on several things also reduces productivity for me. I think paying for someone to sit at a desk is very attractive because there seems to be a greater amount of control, but most likely after several hours in one spot with only one or two breaks- the person is definitely not as productive as they would be when getting to re-energize and rest according to their mental and physical needs.