Disciplined Reading

GJGreyling

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Mar 15, 2015
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The general theory is that one must read between 30 and 50 books to complete a university PHD course.

If we had to read just 15 pages a day, in one year we would have read 5 475 pages which is about 27 books. WOW! Just imagine that, you would about complete a PHD course in over a year by reading just 15 pages a day. Do you think you could learn a thing or two by reading that many books on a subject? I think that it’s fair to say that you could become very knowledgeable on any subject after reading 27 books on that particular subject!

I know that at first I didn’t like to read however, after doing the math and seeing the numbers for myself, I realized that I simply couldn’t afford to miss out on that much knowledge.

So here is my question to everyone. Anyone can read, but who of you take reading seriously and prioritize reading a little bit, every single day?

If so, as a bit of a ‘side question?’ what book or books, are you reading at the moment? :)
 

GJGreyling

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I taking reading and learning seriously. I'm about to finish reading "Joy in the Morning" by Betty Smith.
So what would you say would be the most important thing that you have learned from the book?
 

Brian Perez

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I read everyday for about 30 to 40 minutes. I never really think about how seriously I take reading. I have a desire for knowledge but I don't feel like I should be disciplined in reading. I just desire to learn. If I start to think I should be "Disciplined" then I wouldn't want to read. It's weird how that works for me but I think If you really desire to learn and grow, you don't have to be "Disciplined" in reading you just "want" to read. Don't read to say you read a book read to learn and enjoy the journey! I hope that makes sense.

By the way i'm re-reading Creating A Bug Free Mind by Andy Shaw. So far it is blowing me away and I would recommend it to everyone.
 

Joseph

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I like reading "Think and grow rich" by napoleon hill. It's a book that I've been reading over and over again (different sections). I've seen positive changes in my life by using the simple principles. I recommend it to anyone!
 

Chris Desatoff

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I like reading "Think and grow rich" by napoleon hill. It's a book that I've been reading over and over again (different sections). I've seen positive changes in my life by using the simple principles. I recommend it to anyone!
Oh yeah, what a classic. I wish I could find my old copy...
I'll probably end up buying it again someday. Maybe I can get it for free or super cheap as a ebook? I'm starting to love reading ebooks on my iPad.
 

Chris Desatoff

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I used to be fairly "disciplined" in my reading habit, years ago. But like @Brian Perez above, it was just something I loved doing. I wasn't really timing myself or setting a goal of x pages per day. I just devoured page after page while sipping my daily morning coffee before work.

In recent years, I've hardly read any physical books, though, mostly just online articles and a few free ebooks that bloggers put out there as their opt in bait. I will probably be spending more time at my library though, as I kinda miss lugging around an actual book.
 

andrew112

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For me, the whole problem with reading is that if I just read the words; I wouldn't actually retain what I read. If I want to retain it, I really have to concentrate on it. For example, reading a sentence at least a couple of times before it actually "sinks in". Now things that actually require rote learning; that's different. Then you really do have to memorize verbatim. Examples being mathematical formulas, algorithms, anatomy, languages, nutrition data, graphs, lists, charts, music theory, etc. The enumeration goes on.
 

Joseph

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Hey andrew112,
A friend once told me he would read a section over and over again...until he mastered it.
Its not about how much you read, but what you're doing with what you read. By mastering a section or so in a book he made lots of cash.
And people find them self reading lots of books just for reading sake, but to learn or earn something, they are far from it
 

Chris Desatoff

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Hi @andrew112

Man, I have that EXACT same problem. I'll be reading along, and my brain gets stuck halfway through a sentence while my eyes keep going. Next thing I know, I've read half a page and I have no idea what I just read. Sometimes I have to reread a sentence 5 times before my brain engages and I can move on to the next sentence.

But I don't have that same problem when I listen to audio books, though. I find it a whole lot easier to digest those while I'm driving in my car or whatever.
 

andrew112

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Hey andrew112,
A friend once told me he would read a section over and over again...until he mastered it.
Its not about how much you read, but what you're doing with what you read. By mastering a section or so in a book he made lots of cash.
And people find them self reading lots of books just for reading sake, but to learn or earn something, they are far from it

So it's applying what one knows that counts :).

Someone once said something like this: "To know, and not to do - is not to know."

;)
 

andrew112

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Hi @andrew112

Man, I have that EXACT same problem. I'll be reading along, and my brain gets stuck halfway through a sentence while my eyes keep going. Next thing I know, I've read half a page and I have no idea what I just read. Sometimes I have to reread a sentence 5 times before my brain engages and I can move on to the next sentence.

But I don't have that same problem when I listen to audio books, though. I find it a whole lot easier to digest those while I'm driving in my car or whatever.

Yeah, I really don't know exactly how my brain and memory work. However, sometimes I'll feel pretty fine about my concentration and memory; other times, not so much. Oh well.
 

andrew112

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I definitely don't have the type of memory where I can just read something one time, and remember all of it for the rest of my life. That would be a phenomenal memory.

I'm sure there are people out there that do have that ability. I mean, there are people that have visually eidetic memories; like Kim Peek. They can basically look at a page of any type of information for one second, or less, and be able to recall all of it with astonishing precision. And then you have all of the savants. Peek is one of them.
 

JulienDoria

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Awesome way of thinking about it. I did the same thing when I started to make reading a daily discipline. I am currently reading a book called "How to read a book"... ironic I know. Very interesting to read about the different levels of reading etc..
 
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Awesome way of thinking about it. I did the same thing when I started to make reading a daily discipline. I am currently reading a book called "How to read a book"... ironic I know. Very interesting to read about the different levels of reading etc..
I am currently reading the same! "How to Read a Book" by Mortimer J. Adler & Charles Van Doren. I am really liking this. It is like 'learning how to learn'. If you really love books then you should read this first so that you can grasp what the author really wants to say.

I think if you truly desire knowledge then making reading a daily discipline is not a hard task to do.
 

orlando opiphus

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The general theory is that one must read between 30 and 50 books to complete a university PHD course.

If we had to read just 15 pages a day, in one year we would have read 5 475 pages which is about 27 books. WOW! Just imagine that, you would about complete a PHD course in over a year by reading just 15 pages a day. Do you think you could learn a thing or two by reading that many books on a subject? I think that it’s fair to say that you could become very knowledgeable on any subject after reading 27 books on that particular subject!

I know that at first I didn’t like to read however, after doing the math and seeing the numbers for myself, I realized that I simply couldn’t afford to miss out on that much knowledge.

So here is my question to everyone. Anyone can read, but who of you take reading seriously and prioritize reading a little bit, every single day?

If so, as a bit of a ‘side question?’ what book or books, are you reading at the moment? :)


Hi, I got our point and come to know that many of the readers take lightly reading. Only few of them are serious readers. I am very interested in reading and read books carefully.
 

Ricky O' Shea

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May 7, 2015
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If I'm not writing I'm reading, and if I'm not reading I'm writing, so I take reading very seriously. For me, reading is about learning and sharing that learned knowledge.

To answer your second question, I am currently reading 'The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living' by the Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler. In fact, this is my second time reading this book. I often read books twice. I find you soak up the material a lot better the second time around.

p.s I highly recommend anyone read this book. It's gold dust (y)