Remaining valiant throughout your life

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Queue, Aug 4, 2017. Replies: 4 | Views: 182

  1. Queue

    Queue Coaching Member

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    When faced with intense situations, it involuntarily affects your emotional responses. The neurobiological responses that occur in adults, and adolescence are different. Human beings in their adolescence are still discovering. It is in this experimental stage that recklessness is viewed as fun. This allows their thinking to go beyond certain limits within many situations that are considered risky. The brain of an adult has experience, and can develop an automatic response to similar circumstances.

    An adult's consciousness is more aware of consequences. These differential factors play a major role in the decision-making process. How much caution within a particular set of circumstances should one use, depends on an individual's life experience. If you are unfamiliar with a situation, this allows more room for discovery. Strategic thinking is at work. In a risky situation, making the best choices are vital to your survival. How well does your brain function under pressure? Training your brain, and shaping its agility is important, not just in dangerous situations, but, for its strategic thinking process as well.

    Interpretation
    In many ways, your responses depend on the way that the value of reward are perceived. Excitement involving a possible gain incites mental activity in certain parts of the brain. It is the elevated feelings of expectation that overrides previous ideas, and experiences.

    When circumstances present opportunities that involve choices, all choices fluctuate according to change.

    The factors that determine choice
    Priority

    Emotion

    Urgency

    Striatum and the insula cortex
    The Striatum is a important area within the brain, and it functions as part of the basal ganglia. Controlling desire, and impulses the basal ganglia's process takes place inside th prefrontal cortex.

    Insula cortex
    The insula cortex area contributes to your instincts. This is the innate sense of right and wrong that has a role in the decision-making process. Through experiences patterns of behavior are learned. The brain disregards frontal lobe participation when it has built up an automatic response. This means that the brain will respond quickly, as it would to a pre-existing experience, and is slow moving to an experience that it is not familiar with.

    Amygdala
    The amygdala is another key area of the brain's limbic system. It is responsible for the fight or flight impulse. Together with the insula cortex this makes up the mesocortical limbic circuit.



    Frontal lobe activity
    All conscious thought occurs in the frontal lobes. The frontal lobes occupy about a third of the entire brain. It is responsible for our ability to reason, analyze, and to solve problems. A human being's frontal lobes are not completely developed until about thirty years of age.

    Fluid Intelligence
    Relates to the ability to process new, and unfamiliar circumstances, by using the immediate capacity of strategic thinking.

    Crystallized intelligence
    Defines the information already stored in the brain form previous experiences. This is based on the knowledge that you have mental collected, and how much experience that you have using that knowledge.

    It is important to continue to learn new things. Rejuvenating your brain allows it to develop its ongoing flexibility, and enables it to think strategically. Click here.
     
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  2. Dennielle Lee

    Dennielle Lee Member

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    Well I've learnt a lot of new things by reading this post! Thanks for this super informative contribution to the forum. The brain is so enigmatic and perfectly designed - the most advanced computer that ever existed! It never ceases to amaze me how fascinating it is. :)
     
  3. Queue

    Queue Coaching Member

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    This is true the brain is the original computer, and the inspire for the external mechanical version. While researching information on this subject, I'am Truly drawn into an amazing world of great discovery. Thank you, I fully appreciate your comment and insight.
     
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  4. Visitor

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    Interesting information about valiant thinking and behaviour from a biological viewpoint.

    Today I went on a cycling race which contained several hills. On the first descent all was well until I had to enter into a fast (70 kph) turn. My front wheel started to wobble. Fearing that it may turn into a fishtailing effect I tried to use the front brake, which made it worse. Then I tried the back break, which did not help but not worse. Then I engaged the pedals to go faster, and that made it worse too. So all I could think of was to keep the straightest line as possible and slowly slow down by using the back brake.

    It scared me. I had the wobbles then. Only three weeks ago I went on a memorial ride for a friend who got killed by the very same reasons. His bike fishtailed (death wobble) and was thrown off his bike and his body smashed into the road railing. This recent memory, plus just what happened, added to me losing confidence in descending for the rest of the race. However, I knew that I had to get back on the horse so to speak. So I took calculated risks as to how fast I could go before the wobbles started, then at the end of the following descents I rode as fast as I could, still within that limit, to catch the rest of the field.

    By doing this, riding to the edge of the death wobbles, I regained my confidence. And strangely enough I was still able to win the race. Now my bike is in the shop getting the steering column repaired.

    For me, the psychological battle was facing my fears. Not just from possibly coming off the bike, but my ego wanted me out of the race. It already had past used excuses for me to save face from my friends. I had to use my faith in my past experiences of what is doable or not with the bike. I also knew that if I did back out, I would be several steps backwards in racing confidence. Which may take some time to regain. I know people who have given up cycling on such close-call experiences. I love cycling too much to give it all a miss on a scare.

    Many of my friends say that I do take risks that they themselves would not do. But I do not see it as a risk, because I am confident in what I am doing at the time. Plus I have a history of successes in that maneuver. Much like this thread has mentioned.

    Now I need to learn and practice overcoming death wobbles on a road bike (without wobbling of course).
     
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  5. Queue

    Queue Coaching Member

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    LOL... I agree " without wobbling of course". Strategic thinking does come in handy, Thank you for sharing your story. It provided a deeper understanding, perceiving through your personal experience, and standpoint.
     

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